Lontar (64)

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  • Home by: Leila S. Chudori Rp250.000

    Home is a remarkable fictional account of the September 30th Movement’s impact on people’s lives. This “movement” led to the murder of a million or more presumed “Communists” and the imprisonment of another tens of thousands of people. At the time, thousands of Indonesians who were abroad had their passports revoked and were exiled. History was manipulated by the Suharto government to cast a favorable light on their involvement in this tragedy. A whole generation of Indonesians were raised in a world of forced silence, where facts were suppressed and left unspoken. Although the tumultuous events of 1965 envelop Home’s background, this is not a novel about ideology. Going back and forth between Jakarta and Paris in 1965 and 1998, Home is about the lives of Indonesians in exile, their families and their friends, including those left behind in Indonesia. It is not only a story of love, lust and betrayal, but also of laughter, adventure and food.

  • I Am Woman! by: Lily Yulianti Farid, Oka Rusmini, Putu Wijaya, Rp150.000

    Indonesian author Seno Gumira Ajidarma once wrote, “While journalism speaks with facts, literature speaks with the truth.” The truths found in the fourteen stories in this collection derive from the lives of women in contemporary Indonesia and the ways they manage to carve new spaces for themselves in difficult circumstances. While their victories are not always grand, these women roar as they proclaim their tales.

  • If Fortunes Doesn’t Favor by: Selasih Rp150.000

    If Fortune Does Not Favor offers a unique perspective on the complex situation of Indonesian women during the pre- independence period of Indonesian history. First published in 1933, this novel is considered the first Indonesian novel written by a woman. Selasih, the author, was a fighter working to liberate the homeland during the era when this novel was written. Both to Selasih and within If Fortune Does Not Favor, liberation constituted freedom from everything that shackled happiness.

  • Javanese Gentry by: Umar Kayam Rp250.000

    The Javanese Gentry depicts the implicit concerns of many characters who can only dream of achieving the status of a gentry. When Sastrodarsono returns to his village as a school teacher, by virtue of the job, he becomes a gentry. The book follows Sastrodarsono’s family across different periods of Indonesian history: the late colonial period, the Japanese occupation, the war for independence, and two decades of social disorder that ends in the mid 1960s with the rise of Suharto’s New Order government. Author of a large number of books brimming with different styles and genres, Umar Kayam gained a highly-deserved reputation as the voice of the common man. His books include short story anthologies, essays, novels, and children’s stories. His short story, A Thousand Fireflies, won the Horison Literary Prize in 1967 and he was named the recipient of the 1987 S.E.A. Write Award.

  • Jazz, Perfume & the Incident by: Seno Gumira Ajidarma Rp150.000

    On November 12, 1991, the Indonesian military opened fire on protestors in Dili, East Timor. Hundreds were killed and accounts of this massacre sparked international outrage. In Jakarta, a cover-up began immediately and the Indonesian mass media was cautioned to tow the official line. Seno Gumira Ajidarma refused to do so and transformed documentary evidence into semi-fictional form and published it as novel. This novel is a triptych, the first two of which—“Jazz” and “Perfume”—should be easily recognizable to most readers but “the Incident” is a collage of documents on an event in Indonesian history euphemistically referred to by the same name.

  • Krakatau: The Tale of Lampung Submerged (Syair Lampung Karam) by: Muhammad Saleh Rp175.000

    In August 1883 massive volcanic eruptions destroyed two-thirds of the island of Krakatau, in the Sunda Strait between Sumatra and Java. It was the day the world exploded. A tsunami wreaked havoc in the region, causing countless deaths, and shock waves were recorded around the world. Ash from the eruption affected global weather patterns for years.

    Since that time Krakatau has been the subject of more than 1,000 reports and publications, both scholarly and literary but the only surviving account of the event written by an indigenous eyewitness—Syair Lampung Karam (The Tale of Lampung Submerged), by Muhammad Saleh—has only now, after 130 years, found its way into English translation.

    Thus begins Muhammad Saleh’s account. Written in the form of a syair, a classical Malay rhymed poem, Krakatu: The Tale of Lampung Submerged, sheds light on local responses to the widespread devastation in the region and enriches our knowledge of the Krakatau disaster.

  • Lies, Loss, and Longing by: Putu Oka Sukanta Rp150.000

    Lies, Loss, and Longing portrays the lives of those who survive violence. Sukanta delves deeply into sufferings, using his keen eye for the mundane to expose extraordinary contradictions. Many of the characters in this short story collection are faced with sad endings; nonetheless, there is strength in his characters that gives them, and us, insights into the predicaments and the changes that must happen in Indonesia. Sukanta’s work transcends location and the longing he evokes in his stories are shared by all of us.

  • Makutharama (Javanese Edition) by: Purbo Asmoro Rp225.000

    The world has been struck by multiple natural disasters (earthquakes, land slides, volcanic eruptions, tsunamis), causing great suffering for the common people. Various corrupt officials are taking advantage of the situation, and things are getting worse. Arjuna, the princely hero from the Pandhawa family, has vowed to do something to help. His advisor Semar tells him of a gift of inspired leadership the gods are planning to hand down to a worthy mortal—the legendary King Rama’s philosophy of leadership from generations past. As the antagonist family of Kurawa brothers also struggles for possession of the god’s boon the story unfolds, including numerous secondary plots about characters from the Ramayana (Wibisana, Kumbakarna, Dasamuka) who have yet to have peace in eternity, and are still working out their destiny. Finally, Arjuna meets with an ascetic up in the mountains, and receives the philosophy of inspired leadership which will lead to a more peaceful future.

    Another books in this package:

    The Grand Offering of the Kings – Sesaji Raja Suya (English Edition)

    Persembahan Agung para Raja – Sesaji Raja Suya (Indonesian Edition)

    Sesaji Raja Suya (Javanese Edition)

    Rama’s Crown – Makutharama (English Edition)

    Mahkota Rama – Makutharama (Indonesia Edition)

    Gamelan Scores

  • Menagerie 4: Bali in Writing by: Rp200.000

    Bali has long been one of the most famous travel destinations in the world. With its two million visitors a year, foreign-conceived notions about this island are numberless. But what do the Balinese think of their island and their culture? What do fellow Indonesians think of Bali? Menagerie 4 offers an insider’s view of the Island of the Gods that often contrasts starkly with the popular image manufactured by tourism agencies and travel magazines.

  • Menagerie 5: Violence Towards Women by: Rp200.000

    Regardless of their skin color or belief system, women all over the world experience sexual violence. Menagerie 5 features a dozen stories
    by twelve authors focusing on various aspects of sexual violence towards women, from human trafficking to prostitution and the plight of female guest workers abroad. This collection includes poems by the missing poet- activist Wiji Thukul, reproductions of protest posters produced by Kelompok Rakyat Biasa, and a photographic essay on the 1999 election campaign.

  • Menagerie 6: Indonesian in Exile by: Rp200.000

    Following the so-called Communist coup of 1965, hundreds of leftist Indonesians were unable to return home. In Indonesia, numerous intellectuals were arrested and interned. Menagerie 6 includes ten short stories and 17 poems by Indonesian exile authors as well as two short stories by “domestic” exile writers and two biographical stories of former political prisoners. Collectively, the materials in this collection present a small but evocative part of the Indonesian exile experience.

  • Mirah of Banda by: Hanna Rambe Rp150.000

    Mirah of Banda is the tragic life story of Mirah. Kidnapped from Java, five-year old Mirah is taken to the Banda Islands. The story then becomes a personal account of her life on a nutmeg plantation during the Dutch colonial era, the Japanese Occupation, and the Indonesian Revolution. Mirah’s account includes her experiences as a contract nutmeg picker and the plantation owner’s concubine. The fate of her daughter, Lili, when she is taken away to be a “comfort woman” to Japanese soldiers, is heartbreaking.

  • Morphology of Desire by: Dorothea Rosa Herliany Rp150.000

    Morphology of Desire gives a generous introduction to the writing by the internationally acclaimed Indonesian poet, Dorothea Rosa Herliany. Through a distinctive mix of striking imagery and boldness of voice, the poet sets out to destroy many of the common assumptions about everyday life and human relationships. As a woman and a poet, she is doubly an outsider. Her blatant departure, in form as well as content, from the accepted conventions of society (which intensifies through the progression of her work) is remarkable, not only in its personal and political ramifications, but also in its emotional and imaginative tenor. This book will speak to readers who are interested in Indonesia, women’s writing, and in poetry in general.

  • Never the Twain by: Abdoel Moeis Rp175.000

    The novel Never the Twain ranks among modern Indonesian fiction’s most popular works. Hanafi, the novel’s protagonist, is madly in love with Corrie du Bussee, a beautiful Eurasian, though he is betrothed to his cousin Rapiah. The romantic conflict serves as an allegory for pre-independent Indonesia when, as it struggled to have a national identity, the nation had to choose between adhering to traditional values or adopting Western notions of progress and humanity.

  • Night’s Disappearance by: Gus Tf Sakai Rp150.000

    In a Gus tf Sakai story, nothing is as it seems. The unexpected is always happening. Supernatural events occur in ordinary settings, turning lives and reality on end. A three-hundred-year-old Torajan mummy refuses to stay dead. A painting takes on a life of its own and paints the painter. Gus tf Sakai’s esoteric tales range across the myriad cultures of the Indonesian archipelago, crossing time and space. They lure the reader into their mystery and reveal the author’s deep sense of humanity, leaving us deeply involved in the lives and predicaments of his characters.

  • Oh, oh, oh! by: Idrus Rp150.000

    Idrus’s best known collection of stories, Dari Ave Maria ke Jalan Lain ke Roma, from which most of the stories in
    this anthology were drawn, was first published in 1948 and has been in print ever since. Idrus writes about ordinary people and deals with simple, human themes. With the eye of a journalist, Idrus combines factual reportage and fiction based on fact but reworked to heighten their impact and import.