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  • A Conspiracy of God-killers by: Triyanto Triwikromo Rp175.000

    The poetically-crafted stories found in this collection by Triyanto Triwikromo –the first by this writer in English translation, are leavened by sardonic wit, a touch of the absurd, and the bizarre in a world gone mad. A Conspiracy of God-Killers is not itself the title of any of the short stories in this collection but derives from a suggestion by Triyanto himself. And small wonder! The title embodies the dominant theme of these stories: that organized violence and persecution of the vulnerable amounts to a conspiracy against God.

  • A Student Named Hijo by: Mas Marco Kartodikromo Rp150.000

    A Student Named Hijo has been recognized for depicting a new Indonesian youth culture that has adopted Western cultural and lingual facets. By contrasting traditional Javanese and Dutch cultural values, the author advocated a view that the two are incompatible. This includes love, described in the novel as something only those with

    a Dutch education would attempt to find. Rejected for publication by Balai Pustaka, the Dutch controlled publishing house, the work is now considered a classic.

  • An Old Man’s Rules for Hitchhiking by: John A. McGlynn Rp150.000

    John A McGlynn’s favorite motto was “never let the truth get in the way of a good lie.” But as revealed in his imaginative tales of travels to Mexico, Indonesia, and other exotic ports of call,
    it is often in fantasy that the truth is found. Populated with characters Mark Twain would have appreciated, McGlynn’s stories are those of a modern-day everyman and are as recognizable to an American as they would be to an Indonesian about the common nature of men.

  • And the War is Over by: Ismail Marahimin Rp150.000

    Set in a small Sumatran village during the final days of World War II, And the War is Over is a heart-pounding story where the lives of villagers, Japaese soldiers, Dutch prisoners, and Javanese workers intertwine dramatically, though briefly, in a prisoner camp. When a number of Dutch prisoners conceive an escape plan, tensions arise to a point where human relationships take center stage in this widely acclaimed novel.

  • Andrew and Joey: A Tale of Bali by: Jamie James Rp150.000

    Set in Bali, this novel presents a fascinating picture of the collision between Western gay men and Balinese culture. When Joey Breaux, a choreographer from New York, wins a grant to study in Bali, he believes that the experience will rejuvenate his relationship with his boyfriend, Andrew. Instead, their lives are turned upside down as a result of cultural ignorance and arrogance.

  • Anggadi Tupa: Harvesting the Storm by: John Waromi Rp150.000

    The first ever novel by a Papuan author, this story of generosity, greed, and resilience follows the friendship of several underwater and amphibious creatures. In this ecological parable, John Waromi shows the effects of “harvesting the storm” and reaping the results of actions beyond our control. He sheds light on not only the ecology of the southern Papuan coast but also the lives of its people and their culture.

  • Antologi Drama Indonesia Jilid 1 (1895-1930) by: H. Krafft, F. Wiggers, Kwee Tek Hoay, Rustam Effendi, Oen Tjhing Tiauw, Andjar Asmara, Rp200.000

    In the end of the 19th century, the Dutch Indies grew a new style of performing arts with Malay language known as “Komedi Bangsawan” or the vaudeville. The appearance triggered by urbanization and the need of entertainment. Nevertheless, as shown by the nine plays in this first chapter, the author– mixed or locals – then exploits the opportunity to understand Malay language not just for entertainment but also to disseminate ideas, social concepts, and new philosophies. Slowly, this art performance can be said as the new people’s theatre.

    Another books:

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 2 (1931-1945)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 3 (1946-1968)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 4 (1969-2000)

  • Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 2 (1931-1945) by: Kwee Tek Hoay

    Antologi Drama Indonesia Jilid 1 (1895-1930)

    In the end of the 19th century, the Dutch Indies grew a new style of performing arts with Malay language known as “Komedi Bangsawan” or the vaudeville. The appearance triggered by urbanization and the need of entertainment. Nevertheless, as shown by the nine plays in this first chapter, the author– mixed or locals – then exploits the opportunity to understand Malay language not just for entertainment but also to disseminate ideas, social concepts, and new philosophies. Slowly, this art performance can be said as the new people’s theatre.

  • Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 2 (1931-1945) by: Kwee Tek Hoay, Armijn Pane, Sanusi Pane, Saadah Alim, Adlin Affandi, Usmar Ismail, Merayu Sukma, Kotot Soekardi, Aoh K. Hadimadja, Rp200.000

    The play in 1930s era is a room drama – a drama known better as literature rather than a play. Players in this period of time were not familiar with art performances. But as political way almost closed, they chose to disseminate socio-political ideas through literature or play. The Japanese arrivals in early 1940s changed that. Japan required all arts to be a propaganda tool, and sensory became stricter. But in the 12 plays in this second chapter, the players still insert reform ideas in plays written on colonial times as well as Japanese occupation period.

    Another books:

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 1 (1895-1930)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 3 (1946-1968)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 4 (1969-2000)

  • Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 3 (1946-1968) by: D. Suradji, Utuy Tatang Sontani, Mh. Rustandi Kartakusuma, Mohammad Ali, Sitor Situmorang, Nasjah Djamin, Joebaar Ajoeb, Misbach Yusa Biran, Agam Wispi, Motinggo Boesje, Mohamad Diponegoro, B. Soelarto, Arifin C. Noer, Iwan Simatupang, Rp200.000

    Until the tenth year after Independence, revolution was still a dominant theme in all Indonesian literature genres, including plays. A drastic change and somewhat forced into an independent nation caused a lot of issues due to unpreparedness and sudden anticipation, which was not well planned. The obscurity of post-independence and disorganized “independence” concept was the things that were revealed: cursed, regretted, and mocked in most of the play in this third chapter. The players produced characters tasked to talk about independence impact to the society at large.

    Another books:

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 1 (1895-1930)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 2 (1931-1945)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 4 (1969-2000)

  • Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 4 (1969-2000) by: Iwan Simatupang, Arifin C. Noer, Kuntowijoyo, Putu Wijaya, Noorca Marendra Massardi, Rendra, Wisran Hadi, Saini K.M., Yudhistira ANM Massardi, Rp200.000

    The establishment of Taman Ismail Marzuki (TIM) on 1968 affects the art development as a whole in Indonesia. With the establishment of a theatre there, the theater pupil started to set strategies for public establishment and chose scripts accordingly to the socio-cultural and political contexts at that time. In New Order creations, it was felt the effort to be free from the pressure of the Old Order and succeeded to create artistic reformation, which before was forced to be loyal to realism, whereas at the end of the New Order, most of the creations tend to lean on realism-socialist ideas.

    Another books:

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 1 (1895-1930)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 2 (1931-1945)

    Antologi Drama Indonesia, Jilid 3 (1946-1968)

  • Anxiety Myths by: Afrizal Malna Rp150.000

    In a writing career spanning more than thirty years, Afrizal Malna has published several major collections of poetry and has seen his poems translated into several languages. Afrizal is concerned with questioning language and with bodily engagement with public and private spaces. It is through the appearance of everyday objects that his poems emerge as a repository of the cultural meanings of space and objects in Indonesia’s everyday modernity. His poems maintain a fine balance between consistency of style and variations in theme. These are poems that trace the quickly changing urban trajectory of present day Indonesia.

  • Before Dawn by: Sapardi Djoko Damono Rp150.000

    Sapardi Djoko Damono, one of Indonesia’s most productive and popular poets first began writing poetry as a high school student in the mid- 1950s. Before Dawn includes poems written by the author over a forty year time span, from 1961 to 2001. Arranged as they are in chronological order, the poems in Before Dawn together form a kind of poetic autobiography.

    In “One Night,” written in 1964, the author is a young Muslim boy crying outside the church door as his classmates celebrate Christmas. In the 1967 poem, “For my Wife,” he is a young husband telling his wife that “the earth holds a spray of flowers, just for you.” In the 1981 poem, “In the Hands of Children,” he is now a doting father marveling that “in the hands of children, paper becomes Sinbad’s ship.” Jump to the 1989 poem, “At the Restaurant,” and he is now middle aged and wondering about the constancy of relationships – whether two people can ever truly share an eternal love. And finally, in the 2001 title poem, “Before Dawn,” the poet is a much older man, whose concerns are mental and physical frailty and, of course, death.

    Available in e-book

  • Borobudur and other poems by: Jennifer Mackenzie Rp95.000

    At the time of the construction of the Borobudur in the ninth century, Buddhism had been established in Java for several centuries. Jennifer Mackenzie’s Borobodur, an exquisite long poem, tells the story of its legendary architect, Gunavarman, and of Indonesia’s mystical monument with cultural understanding, sensitivity, and great feeling. Like Gunavarman by the poem’s end, Mackenzie becomes a “dot on the horizon” leaving us stilled in silence

  • Ceremony by: Korrie Rayun Lampan Rp150.000

    A coming-of-age story, a tapestry of erotic and tragic liaisons, a dreamscape of nightmares and wonders. But Ceremony is, above all, a tribute to the ceremony-rich life of the Benuaq Dayak, one of the many “upriver people” of Kalimantan. This post-modern (and first) novel by Korrie Layun Rampan took Indonesian literary scene by storm when it won the Jakarta Arts Council’s novel writing competition award in 1977. After winning the award, Korrie continued to establish himself as one of Indonesia’s major literary figures, but four decades later, Ceremony still has the power to thrill, awe, and mystify readers. This edition is graced by an informative introduction by noted French scholar, Bernard Sellato, on the rituals of the Benuaq Dayak people. It also contains a critique of the original edition by Indonesian poet and translator Dodong Djiwapradja.

  • Departures by: Nh. Dini Rp175.000

    As a flight attendant for the new Indonesian Airlines, Elisa is determined to establish her independence and find a place where she really belongs. With a troubled family background and almost no knowledge of her ancestors, Elisa is searching for her true identity. The search for her true father proves to be heartbreaking and Elisa grows to hope that her marriage to a handsome Javanese man she fell deeply in love with will give her a sense of belonging ad stability. In this novel, Elisa learns what it means to be a young woman finding her way in the troubled early years of Indonesia’s independence.